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New Intel Core processors mean slimmer computers, long-lasting batteries

Processor improvements don't necessarily mean a boost in everyday tasks like email and web browsing, but they will mean thinner machines that have longer battery lives.

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Intel debuted its much awaited next chip line up previously codenamed Skylake. More than 50 new processors will appear in hundreds of PCs.

As the PC market continues to decline, this announcement is an important one for Intel. Processor improvements don't necessarily mean a boost in everyday tasks like email and web browsing, but they will mean thinner machines that have longer battery lives.


Intel is also figuring out a way to apply the technology its creating to a wider market than just PCs.

So a lot of these technologies, we start in the PC,--and you're going to see them in 6th generation core—but they have huge applicability as we bring them to hundreds of millions and cost reduce them for the internet of things. And just an example the Real Sense technology is expanding to provide a natural interface to all kinds of devices.

Intel showed examples of how--using Real Sense--you could unlock a PC with your face, how you could map a room using Google's Project Tango or take a 3D scan of yourself to add into a video game.

For the 6th gen core processors, a lot of the focus was on graphics, both for gaming and video playback and editing.


Core i3, i5 and i7 chips are aimed at mainstream machines, while the m series are designed for PCs and 2-in1s.